The purpose of this Blog

This blog is to detail my 43 years (1973 - 2016) with a 1928 Chevrolet tourer, affectionately called "The Red Chev".

The acquisition, restoration, improvements and my experiences over the years are covered in as much detail as I can remember.

Some of the later postings include car club outings and other vintage car items that I hope will be of interest to people.

If you have the time, scroll back to where it all began in 1973 and follow the journey so far.

Thanks for dropping by.

Regards Ray Dean


See my new section "The Red Chev - Repairs, Improvements, Maintenance and Technical Details" located on the left hand side of the screen.




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Saturday, March 29, 2014

1912 First Chevrolet Production

The year is 1912, and this picture is titled "The First Production Chevrolet"


Is this a 1912 on the road, in Right Hand Drive? No Sir.

This is a 1914 4 cylinder Oakland. Very similar to a Classic Six in appearance. Noticeable differences are the height of the fenders, the location of the filler neck in the grille shell, and the style of the firewall, as well as the right hand drive. As far anyone knows, no Classic Sixes were built right hand drive. Thanks to Bruce Pearce and Charlie Brennan for the corrections.



A 1912 model in need of TLC. Did it survive?

 
Yes, I am pleased to say it is still with us. Thanks to Bruce Pearce for sending me a picture that I have seen before but did not associate with this posting.
 
The car survives as pictured, and can be found in the Reynolds Museum in Alberta, Canada. It in the oldest known Chevrolet in existence, #93 down the production line. It is believed that it was partially built in the first Chevrolet factory in Detroit, then shipped to and completed in Flint when that Chevrolet factory opened.
 
 

4 comments:

  1. Hi Ray

    Did you notice the first car is left had drive and the second one is right hand drive, and the photo has not been reversed as the number plate is still legible.

    Regards
    Charlie Brennan

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good Call Charlie, any thoughts apart from the 2nd picture a possible Canadian car?

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  3. We discussed this on the VCCA chat site, and came to the conclusion that the second car is a 1914 4 cylinder Oakland. Very similar to a Classic Six in appearance! Member "Gunsmoke" did the legwork in identifying the make. Noticeable differences are the height of the fenders, the location of the filler neck in the grille shell, and the style of the firewall, as well as the right hand drive. As far anyone knows, no Classic Sixes were built right hand drive.

    Bruce Pearce

    ReplyDelete
  4. The bottom photo survived as pictured, and can be found in the Reynolds Museum in Alberta, Canada. It in the oldest known Chevrolet in existence, #93 down the production line. It is believed that it was partially built in the first Chevrolet factory in Detroit, then shipped to and completed in Flint when that Chevrolet factory opened.

    The very same car, as it sits today...

    Bruce Pearce
    [URL=http://s150.photobucket.com/user/brewsterg6/media/1913ChevroletClassicSix.jpg.html][IMG]http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s84/brewsterg6/1913ChevroletClassicSix.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    ReplyDelete